Forum Magistrorum http://www.forummagistrorum.com For teachers of Latin and Greek Tue, 21 Mar 2017 15:52:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.6 43862277 ACL 2016: Authentic Engagement and Student Empowerment http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2016/07/acl-2016-authentic-engagement-and-student-empowerment/ Tue, 05 Jul 2016 17:30:14 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=584 Read more ›]]> UPDATE: On June 28, 2016, Melanie and I had the pleasure of presenting at the American Classical League Summer Institute in Austin, TX. Our talk, “Authentic Engagement and Student Empowerment,” is available as a PDF which includes not only the slides shown, but also the “script” of the presentation, which has been placed on contrasting-colored pages normally after the slide discussed in each bit of the script.

(attachment temporarily removed)

In the first half of the presentation, we urge teachers not to lose sight of the ultimate goal of accessing Roman history and culture through Latin. Input that is both comprehensible and compelling can also provide core vocabulary and historical/cultural knowledge, thereby facilitating the transition to classical literature without sacrificing the benefits of Comprehensible Input (CI) and Extensive (rather than Intensive) Reading. We suggest some specific texts, mostly novellas and comics written for learners, that support this goal.

In the second half, we suggest ways to give students a sense of ownership and personal investment when dealing with culturally authentic texts. We also discuss how to help students develop a sense of self-efficacy and a growth mindset. Finally, we consider how learning (in the sense of the conscious process of learning about a language) can support acquisition (an unconscious process, such as the experience with one’s first language), with the goal of preparing students to become independent, lifelong learners.

Here is the original abstract:

Educators often discuss how to get students engaged, but seldom question “engaged in what?” “The Latin (or Greek) language” is one answer that perhaps no one would dispute, but when classical language instruction focuses on modern life in order to generate enthusiasm, we risk exacerbating the tension (already felt by many teachers, whatever their preferred approach[es]) between the communication and culture standards. In this panel, we will first discuss not only how to leverage pre-existing interest in Greco-Roman culture into engagement with the language, but also how to use Latin to generate interest in the culture. Secondly, we will discuss strategies to give students more control over their own learning in order to overcome potential inhibitors and to develop the ability and desire to work independently, which facilitates the voluntary reading of engaging material that research has shown to benefit language acquisition.

Link to online schedule: http://sched.co/6Yg8

General information about the Institute here: https://www.aclclassics.org/events/2016-acl-institute

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Asterix comics in Latin http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2016/07/asterix-comics-in-latin/ Fri, 01 Jul 2016 22:07:12 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=589 ]]> Many of the Latin translations of the Belgian-French series of Asterix comics are available through Amazon.com in the US, but they are less expensive if ordered through Amazon.de. For example, as of this writing, a typical volume costs nearly $40 in the US vs. 12 euro from Germany. Even adding shipping to my US address, ordering a volume from Germany cost only $20; if you order more than one book at once, the savings is even greater (e.g. $36 for 2 books). Of course, this is with the slowest shipping option from Germany.

Here are links to Amazon.de for my favorites so far:
Asterix Gallus
Asterix apud Gothos
Asterix Gladiator
Asterix et Cleopatra
Asterix Legionarius

Filius Asterigis

Here are links to US Amazon (may not appear if you are using an ad blocker):

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Latin Teacher Idea Exchange (Facebook group) http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2016/02/latin-teacher-idea-exchange-facebook-group/ Thu, 11 Feb 2016 21:32:08 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=580 ]]> https://www.facebook.com/groups/LatinTeacherIdeaExchange/

A group for teachers of Latin at all levels. Their official description reads:

“This group was created as a tool for sharing teaching ideas and practices. Please invite any Latin teachers you know to join us and share!”

Recent posts range from how to respond to a sneeze in Latin to pedagogical uses of 3D printers.

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American Classical League http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2015/11/american-classical-league/ Mon, 30 Nov 2015 20:20:39 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=574 ]]> https://www.aclclassics.org

The American Classical League was founded in 1919 for the purpose of fostering the study of classical languages in the United States and Canada. Membership is open to any person who is committed to the preservation and advancement of our classical inheritance from Greece and Rome.

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Using Technology for Good in the Latin Classroom http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2015/11/using-technology-for-good-in-the-latin-classroom/ Sat, 21 Nov 2015 01:26:24 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=564 Read more ›]]> Here (at last) is my presentation on using technology in teaching Latin, delivered at the American Classical League Institute in June 2015. It describes the advantages of integrating technology as a way both to increase engagement and to improve learning. The goal is to motivate students to spend more time reading and writing Latin by means of creative digital projects and auto-correcting, game-like activities. Fuller discussion is included on extra slides in between the actual presentation slides.

(I found quite a few shocking typos in revising this for the blog, but please let me know if you notice others).

32 MBACL2015_Tech-for-Good_Livingston_2015-11-20
Roman boy with tiger says "Salve, mater" while Roman woman screams.

Comic panel made in Halftone2 iOS app

Bonus: a little montage of original photo to finished comic panel; you will see that the projects proposed in the presentation do not need to be this elaborate (most are just against the orange backdrop), but if your students want to geek out, why not?. First panel is the original photo (my usual orange plastic cutting board would have blended in with the tiger, so I stuck a sheet of white paper behind the figures); second panel shows two images (wall and floor) combined to form a new background; third panel has speech bubble and other text added. The perspective is weird, but the point is the Latin, not the art.

original, new background, text added

From original photo to comic.

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Classical to the Core, part 4: Milites http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/11/classical-to-the-core-part-4-milites/ Mon, 17 Nov 2014 22:48:23 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=545 Read more ›]]> Part 4 of the presentation delivered at ACTFL 2013 in Orlando.
Read the Introduction to “Classical to the Core.”

This part of the presentation looks at various aspects of military life (with evidence from literature, letters, and inscriptions), as well as funerary monuments. Note that this is not a ready-to-use lesson, but rather a set of ideas that can be adapted for your class. If you download the Keynote or PowerPoint version, please be sure to read the presenter notes. Warning: The presentation was created in Keynote; the PowerPoint version may be glitchy, but you should be able to get the idea.

Tomb of Scipio Barbatus

Tomb of Scipio Barbatus

17 MBACTFL2013 pt 4 Milites, Keynote, zipped 41 MBACTFL2013 pt 4 Milites, PowerPoint 17 MBACTFL2013 pt 4 Milites, PDF

 

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Classical to the Core, part 3: Cursus honorum http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/11/classical-to-the-core-part-3-cursus-honorum/ Fri, 14 Nov 2014 23:47:28 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=528 Read more ›]]> Part 3 of the presentation delivered at ACTFL 2013 in Orlando.
Read the Introduction to “Classical to the Core.”

This part of the presentation suggests ways to introduce beginning students to the cursus honorum and to Roman roads and aqueducts (focusing on the life and works of Appius Claudius Caecus), using primary sources (mostly literary), which students will begin learning to evaluate for reliability. Note that this is not a ready-to-use lesson, but rather a set of ideas that can be adapted for your class. If you download the Keynote or PowerPoint version, please be sure to read the presenter notes. Warning: The presentation was created in Keynote; the PowerPoint version may be glitchy, but you should be able to get the idea.

46 MBACTFL2013 pt 3 Cursus Keynote, zipped 33 MBACTFL2013 pt 3 Cursus PowerPoint 17 MBACTFL2013 pt 3 Cursus PDF ]]>
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Classical to the Core, part 2: Nomina http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/11/classical-to-the-core-part-2-nomina/ Thu, 13 Nov 2014 16:13:00 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=521 Read more ›]]> Part 2 of the presentation delivered at ACTFL 2013 in Orlando.
Read the Introduction to “Classical to the Core.”

Personified Libertas (obverse); L. Junius Brutus, with lictors (reverse)

Personified Libertas (obverse); L. Junius Brutus, with lictors (reverse)

This part of the presentation shows how primary sources (texts, coins, and inscriptions) can be used to introduce beginning students to Roman naming conventions. Note that this is not a ready-to-use lesson, but rather a set of ideas that can be adapted for your class. If you download the Keynote or PowerPoint version, please be sure to read the presenter notes. Warning: The presentation was created in Keynote; the PowerPoint version may be glitchy (and you’ll miss the fiery transition of Scaevola), but you should be able to get the idea.

6 MBACTFL2013 pt 2 Nomina Keynote file, zipped 10 MBACTFL2013 pt 2 Nomina PowerPoint 5 MBACTFL2013 pt 2 Nomina PDF ]]>
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Classical to the Core, part 1: Imperium Romanum http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/11/classical-to-the-core-part-1-imperium-romanum/ Thu, 13 Nov 2014 15:20:02 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=505 Read more ›]]> Part 1 of the presentation delivered at ACTFL 2013 in Orlando.
Read the Introduction to “Classical to the Core.

This part of the presentation suggests ways to introduce beginning students to the extent of the Roman empire and to coins as a primary source. Note that this is not a ready-to-use lesson, but rather a set of ideas that can be adapted for your class. If you download the Keynote or PowerPoint version, please be sure to read the presenter notes. Warning: The presentation was created in Keynote; the PowerPoint version may be glitchy, but you should be able to get the idea.

Map of Roman Empire, 117 AD

Map of Roman Empire, 117 AD

 

5 MBACTFL2013 pt 1 Imperium Keynote file, zipped 7 MBACTFL2013 pt 1 Imperium PowerPoint 3 MBACTFL2013 pt 1 Imperium PDF ]]>
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Classical to the Core, Intro http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/11/classical-to-the-core-intro/ Wed, 12 Nov 2014 13:21:49 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=503 Read more ›]]> Here are the introductory remarks from our presentation “Classical to the Core: Latin as the Linchpin to the Standards” at the 2013 ACTFL annual convention. The full presentation, broken into sections, will be provided in subsequent posts.

Please note that although we point out how various learning activities support specific Common Core Standards, the ideas contained within the body of the presentation can be used in any Latin classroom.

Last year, we tried to demonstrate how you could satisfy the standards of the 5 Cs while actually teaching the Latin language. But already people were talking a lot about another set of C-words, the Common Core. Whereas the 5 Cs are standards for foreign language teaching, the Common Core, at the moment, does not address foreign languages at all. Therein lie the problems. First, the study of languages is at risk of being forgotten or, worse, deemed irrelevant with all the focus on the Common Core. Second is the problem of how we can support standards that do not even acknowledge our field.

On the one hand, we hope to demonstrate how the study of Classics is relevant to all the strands of the Common Core. While connections to the English Language Arts standards naturally come to mind (and were beautifully presented by Anne Mullay yesterday), we’d like to show that Classics can be seen as the linchpin uniting all standards across the board.

On the other hand, we will present ideas for teaching the Latin language and Roman culture through authentic texts and artifacts. Students will learn how we know what we know by using various methods of the discipline such as numismatics, epigraphy, and prosopography. We will look at how individual Romans created a particular public image in life or even in death, how the dead could be used to promote the public image of an individual or a family, and how the Romans collectively saw themselves in relation to others and created a unique legacy unmatched across time and space.

While the topics are thematically related and follow a sort of logical progression, we want to stress that these are ideas, not a fully developed unit or even complete lesson plans. But we do have lots of useable images and texts for you to take away an try in your own classrooms. We think these are things that can be used intermittently with any of the common syllabi.

We’d also like to acknowledge now the other presenters this year whose ideas, we feel, dovetail with what you’re about to hear: Leigh Hansen this morning, the teachers from the Bolles School on Roman values, Jason Reynolds of Greenwich Country Day on Roman history, and Jane Crawford of UVA on themes and essential questions.

Before we get started, since the order of presentation is not chronological, we strongly recommend creating a persistent timeline for the term or year that can be added to whenever new events or people are encountered.

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deCordova sundial http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/07/decordova-sundial/ Tue, 08 Jul 2014 22:25:19 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=482 Read more ›]]> Just a photo of a sundial from the deCordova Sculpture Park. The interesting thing about the Latin is that, assuming revertit is a present tense, it has to be from reverto instead of revertor. Students could be challenged to compose other suitable texts for a sundial. Or to find other Latin examples to share.

How sundials (and other ancient time-telling tools, like water-clocks) work are also a nice scientific/cultural topic.

Sol revertit

Photo by author, taken at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

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Latin in the work of Ian Hamilton Finlay http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2014/07/ian-hamilton-finlay/ Tue, 08 Jul 2014 21:08:22 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=471 Read more ›]]> A recent trip to the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum prompted this post. The work of Scottish artist and poet Ian Hamilton Finlay (1926–2006) often includes text, classical references, or both. This post shows examples of classical quotation and original Latin in his work, which can be a model for a student project.

This work includes the quotation “Habitarunt di quoque silvas” from Virgil Eclogues 2.60 (apologies for the shadow which obscures the tops of the Ts). Like many other students of Latin, I find it useful to have memorable examples of particular Latin forms and this one is good for the contracted v-perfects (habitarunt for habitaverunt); see Allen and Greenough 181.

Habitarunt di quoque silvas

Photo by author, taken at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

Several of Finlay’s lithographs (now at the Tate) show a hatred of the Arts Council (all showing the i-stem genitive plural):

Mors concilio artium

Ian Hamilton Finlay Death to the Arts Council 1982 © Estate of Ian Hamilton Finlay

This second one has a nice gerundive, doubtless modeled on everyone’s favorite example “Carthago delenda est.” The two can be compared to illustrate the necessity of the gerundive to agree with the noun.

Concilium artium delendum est

Ian Hamilton Finlay The Arts Council Must be Utterly Destroyed 1982 © Estate of Ian Hamilton Finlay

The third more pointedly (no pun intended) imitates an actual inscription, with the interpuncts and abbreviated CONC for concilium.

Pax tuguriis bellum conc artium

Ian Hamilton Finlay Peace to the Cottages – War to the Arts Council 1982
© Estate of Ian Hamilton Finlay

Similar prints (whether individual or as a series) would be a nice, easy student project adaptable for different levels. Something like “mos + dative” could be done by beginning students, gerundives by more advanced ones.

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Motor Bus, declined http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/11/motor-bus-declined/ Fri, 15 Nov 2013 02:05:33 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/wpb/?p=148 Read more ›]]> Motor Bus in 1926

Motor Bus in 1926. State Library of South Australia
Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license

“The Motor Bus” (1914), by Alfred Denis Godley, is a macaronic (mixed-language) poem that combines Latin with English by treating motor bus as a second declension noun modified by a third declension adjective. At the time of its composition, motor buses had recently been introduced into the city of Oxford (note the references to Cornmarket and High Streets).

What is this that roareth thus?
Can it be a Motor Bus?
Yes, the smell and hideous hum
Indicat Motorem Bum!
Implet in the Corn and High
Terror me Motoris Bi.
Bo Motori clamitabo
Ne Motore caedar a Bo—
Dative be or Ablative
So thou only let us live:—
Whither shall thy victims flee?
Spare us, spare us, Motor Be!
Thus I sang; and still anigh
Came in hordes Motores Bi,
Et complebat omne forum
Copia Motorum Borum.
How shall wretches live like us
Cincti Bis Motoribus?
Domine, defende nos
Contra hos Motores Bos!

Before reading this poem, it would be useful to discuss how the modern pronunciation of Latin varies from country to country. American students may already be aware that “alumni” and “alumnae” as naturalized English words reflect the pronunciation often associated with England. If you haven’t already gone into this, an interesting follow-up activity might be for students to think about how one would go about determining how classical Latin was pronounced and then do a little research into what we think we know and what the evidence is.

From a language-learning standpoint, this should be a great reminder of the need to make nouns and adjectives agree (rather than making their endings “match”). It’s also got nice examples of the ablative with a compound of pleo and with cingo. Speaking of ablatives, the bus appears in the ablative with a(b) as an agent, which suits its personification throughout the poem (the bus is shouted at and addressed in the vocative).

You can follow-up the in-class activity with an assignment for students to write their own macaronic poem, ideally treating an issue that has affected their own life or community. Since it’s not entirely in Latin, students can use vocabulary, morphology, and syntax that they know, but aren’t limited by that. Hence the activity is appropriate for students at quite early stages of study.

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Henry V http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/11/henry-v/ Tue, 05 Nov 2013 17:47:31 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/wpb/?p=57 Read more ›]]> DVD cover of Kenneth Branagh's Henry V

DVD cover of Kenneth Branagh’s Henry V

In Kenneth Branagh’s film of Henry V, after the Battle of Agincourt, the king orders his surviving men to sing “Non Nobis” and “Te Deum.” Only the former is actually dramatized, with an arrangement by Patrick Doyle. Here is a snippet:

Transcription (the same lyrics are repeated for the duration of the song):

Non nobis, Domine, Domine,
Non nobis, Domine,
Sed nomini, sed nomini tuo da gloriam.

Leaving aside the repetition of certain words, this is actually a straightforward example of dare taking a direct and an indirect object. While the personal pronouns and possessive adjectives may make it a bit hard for students first experiencing indirect objects, it would be a nice listening exercise for students learning or reviewing personal and possessive pronouns. Also note that this is almost certainly an example of non negating just the following word, nobis, in contrast to nomini tuo, not an unusual use of non negating an imperative.

The recording above  is taken from the version of Non Nobis Domine on the album Cinema Choral Classics), which has much clearer pronunciation than in the actual film, where nomini sounds more like nomine. I don’t think there is anything much to be gained by watching the actual scene (esp. if students haven’t seen the rest of the film), but if you really want to, here’s a YouTube clip (with some extra context at the beginning).

Fun fact: the dead boy being carried by Henry was played by Christian Bale, whom students may know from The Dark Knight (Batman) movies.

If any schools still read Henry V in English classes, you can make a Connection (in the 5Cs sense) there.

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“The Art of Reading Latin: How to Teach It” http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/09/the-art-of-reading-latin-how-to-teach-it/ Mon, 23 Sep 2013 13:44:42 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=437 ]]> A lecture delivered in 1886 by William Gardner Hale at Cornell University, where he was Professor of Latin, about how students should be taught to approach a Latin sentence.

“The Art of Reading Latin: How to Teach It” (at an old website by Anne Mahoney)

Also available on Perseus and as a Google eBook.

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Navigating the 5 C’s, part 4: Itinera Aeneae http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/09/navigating-the-5-cs-part-4-itinera-aeneae/ Mon, 23 Sep 2013 02:31:10 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=420 Read more ›]]> Map of journeys of Aeneas from Troy to Latium

Map from http://faculty.gvsu.edu/websterm/Aeneid.htm

This post concludes the series covering our 2012 ACTFL presentation; you may want to read the IntroductionPart 1Part 2, and Part 3 first.

This is more of a pre-AP level activity which can be used as an introduction to the locative if it comes late in your textbook (as in the Cambridge Latin course) or it can be used as a review of expressions of place.

Unlike the previous parts of this presentation, there is a full PowerPoint available (coming soon), as well as the slides from ACTFL. Please be sure to view the presenter notes on the ACTFL slides.

The presentation concludes with a few remarks with brief suggestions for other activities.

Itinera Aeneae Keynote file with presenter notes, zipped Itinera Aeneae pdf with notes

 

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Navigating the 5 C’s, part 3: Labores Herculi http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/03/navigating-the-5-cs-part-3-labores-herculi/ Sat, 09 Mar 2013 04:31:58 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=387 Read more ›]]> John Singer Sargent painting of Hercules and the Hydra

John Singer Sargent (1856–1925). Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

This post continues the series covering our 2012 ACTFL presentation; you may want to read the IntroductionPart 1, and Part 2 first.

This set of activities, like Part 1, has a mythological theme, illustrated with ancient and modern art, but is for students who are farther along. The slides linked below describe a sequence of three activities using review of the pluperfect passive indicative as a way to lead into practice with the ablative absolute.

If students are familiar with the “story” of Hercules, you can have them lay some groundwork by describing his lineage (which they should be able to do in Latin; see the introduction to the Olympians and family relationship terms in Part 1), the reason he had to perform the labors, etc.

Please note that this is not a complete, ready-to-use lesson plan, but rather an idea that you can build on and adapt. Please be sure to view the presenter notes for details.

Labores Herculis Keynote file with presenter notes, zipped Labores Herculis PDF with presenter notes ]]>
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Navigating the 5 C’s, part 2: Domus Romana http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/02/navigating-the-5-cs-part-2-domus-romana/ Mon, 11 Feb 2013 04:14:42 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=376 Read more ›]]>
Spoleto084

Atrium of 1st c. AD Roman house in Spoleto, Italy. Photo by Georges Jansoone (JoJan) CC-BY-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

This post continues the series covering our 2012 ACTFL presentation; you may want to read the Introduction and Part 1 first.

This set of activities focuses around the Roman house and household.

The first activity gives very novice students practice with using in plus the ablative and in plus the accusative while exploring the spaces within a typical Roman house. Later activities cast students as members of the household (both citizens and slaves) for practicing the use of vocatives and imperatives in the context of everyday activities.

Please note that this is not a complete, ready-to-use lesson plan, but rather an idea that you can build on and adapt. Please be sure to view the presenter notes for details.

Domus Romana Keynote file with presenter notes, zipped Domus Romana pdf file with presenter notes ]]>
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Committee for the Promotion of Latin http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/01/committee-for-the-promotion-of-latin/ Sun, 13 Jan 2013 17:53:25 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=363 Read more ›]]> From their website: “The Committee for the Promotion of Latin (CPL), a standing committee of CAMWS, was established in 1979 to create new Latin programs, to expand existing Latin programs, and to assist students of Latin in receiving in the greatest benefits from their study of Classics.”

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Latinteach http://www.forummagistrorum.com/2013/01/latinteach/ Sun, 13 Jan 2013 17:44:58 +0000 http://www.forummagistrorum.com/?p=359 subscription form link). The associated blog seems to be updated more often than the website.]]> Latinteach maintains a mailing list for teachers to share ideas, lesson plans, etc (subscription form link). The associated blog seems to be updated more often than the website.

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